Experimental Alzheimer's Drug May Help Repair Teeth

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An experimental Alzheimer's drug may help to regenerate teeth.
An experimental Alzheimer's drug may help to regenerate teeth.

HealthDay News — Teeth might someday repair themselves using their own stem cells — eliminating the need for conventional fillings, according to an experimental study published in Scientific Reports.

Paul Sharpe, PhD, a professor of craniofacial biology at the Dental Institute at King's College London, and colleagues placed biodegradable collagen sponges laced with a low dose of a small molecule GSK3 antagonist (Tideglusib) over holes drilled into the teeth of mice.

Over 6 weeks, as the sponge degraded, it was replaced by new dentine, leading to complete, natural repair, Dr Sharpe told HealthDay.

"This simple, rapid natural tooth repair process could thus potentially provide a new approach to clinical tooth restoration," the authors wrote.

Reference

Neves VC, Babb R, Chandrasekaran D, Sharpe PT. Promotion of natural tooth repair by small molecule GSK3 antagonists. Sci Rep. 2017;7:39654.

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