Short Sleep Duration Linked to Increased Risk for CVD and Stroke Mortality

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At least 6 hours of sleep was considered normal while fewer than 6 hours was considered short.
At least 6 hours of sleep was considered normal while fewer than 6 hours was considered short.

Short sleep duration is associated with an increased risk for mortality in both cardiovascular disease (CVD) and stroke, according to research presented at SLEEP 2017, the Sleep Research Society annual meeting in Boston, Massachusetts, June 3-7, and simultaneously published in a supplement of SLEEP.1,2

Although short sleep duration has been associated with CVD and cerebrovascular disease (CBV), many previous studies have depended upon self-reported measures and treated sleep duration as a singular, independent predictor, meaning its role as a predictor of mortality is not well defined.

Therefore, researchers from the Sleep Research and Treatment Center at Penn State University College of Medicine in Hershey, Pennsylvania, collected data from 1741 adults (mean age, 48.8) in the sleep laboratory. At least 6 hours of polysomnographic sleep was categorized as normal while fewer than 6 hours was categorized as short, based on the median time of the cohort.

Mortality associated with CVD had a hazard ratio (HR) of 1.39 (95% CI, 1.09-1.79), while CBV had an HR of 1.88 (95% CI, 1.13-3.12). A significant interaction revealed that short sleep duration modified these associations (P =.02).

CVD and CBV mortality risks significantly increased in individuals with short sleep duration (HR, 1.83; 95% CI, 1.32-2.54 and HR, 2.39; 95% CI, 1.28-4.44, respectively) but not in individuals with normal sleep duration (HR, 0.87; 95% CI, 0.59-1.29 and HR, 1.26; 95% CI, 0.52-3.07, respectively).

“It is likely that adults with CVD or stroke and short sleep duration suffer from greater central autonomic and metabolic dysregulation,” the researchers noted. “Clinical trials should test whether lengthening sleep improves the long-term prognosis of adults with CVD or stroke.”

References

  1. Fernandez-Mendoza J, He F, Vgonizas AN, Liao D, Bixler EO. Impact of short sleep duration on mortality risk associated with cardiovascular disease and stroke. Abstract 1015. Presented at: SLEEP 2017; June 3-7, 2017; Boston, Massachusetts.
  2. Fernandez-Mendoza J, He F, Vgonizas AN, Liao D, Bixler EO. Impact of short sleep duration on mortality risk associated with cardiovascular disease and stroke. Abstract 1015. SLEEP. 2017;40(Abstract Suppl):A378. 
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