Michael Laposata, Author at Neurology Advisor - Page 7 of 8

Michael Laposata

All articles by Michael Laposata

Antiplasmin Deficiency

At a Glance Antiplasmin is the natural inhibitor of the proteolytic enzyme plasmin, which is generated from the activation of plasminogen. In the absence of antiplasmin, the proteolytic enzyme plasmin excessively degrades fibrin clots, while it also degrades proteins on the platelet surface and in the circulation, including the coagulation factors. It is for this…

Hemophilia B (Factor IX Deficiency) – Acquired

At a Glance Acquired factor IX deficiency can occur in a number of situations. One possibility is the presence of a spontaneously developed specific inhibitor to factor IX. Such an antibody can also appear in a patient with hemophilia B (factor IX deficiency) following treatment with factor IX, either prophylactically or to treat a bleeding…

Hemophilia B (Factor IX Deficiency) – Congenital

At a Glance Hemophilia B, a deficiency of factor IX, is clinically indistinguishable from hemophilia A, a deficiency of factor VIII. A deficiency of factor IX results in a prolongation of the partial thromboplastin time (PTT). It is an inherited bleeding disorder that is sex-linked and affects males with rare exceptions. The female carriers do…

Hemophilia A (Factor VIII Deficiency) – Congenital

At a Glance Hemophilia A is a deficiency of factor VIII, and a deficiency of this factor results in a prolongation of the partial thromboplastin time (PTT). It is an inherited bleeding disorder that is sex linked and affects males with rare exceptions. The female carriers do not typically have bleeding disorders. A family history…

Factor V Deficiency – Acquired

At a Glance Acquired factor V deficiency can occur in a number of situations. One possibility is the presence of a specific inhibitor to factor V. This can occur in a patient with factor V deficiency following treatment with products containing factor V, such as fresh frozen plasma, either prophylactically, or to treat a bleeding…

Thrombocytopenia

Differential Diagnosis Splenomegaly with platelet sequestration Increased platelet destruction by an immune mechanism; can occur as a result of: Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) Idiopathic or immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) Drug (other than heparin)-induced thrombocytopenia Post-transfusion purpura (PTP) Increased platelet destruction by non-immune mechanisms, as caused by: DIC Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) Decreased…

Leukopenia

Differential Diagnosis Most cases of leukopenia are associated with a low number of granulocytes. Decreased production of granulocytes may be caused by marrow failure, infiltration of the marrow by leukemic cells or metastatic cancer cells, suppression of granulocyte production by certain drugs, and vitamin B12 or folate deficiency. There may be an accelerated removal of…

Coagulopathies and bleeding disorders; Hemorrhage, Clotting Abnormalities, Microvascular Bleeding

Bleeding and Coagulopathies Synonyms Hemorrhage, Clotting Abnormalities, Microvascular Bleeding Related Conditions Acquired Coagulopathies (thrombocytopenia, disseminated intravascular coagulation, coagulopathy of liver disease, drug-induced platelet dysfunction, hyperfibrinolysis, acquired clotting factor inhibitors) Inherited Bleeding Disorders (Hemophilia A, Hemophilia B, Other Clotting Factor Deficiencies, Qualitative Platelet Disorders, Inherited Thrombocytopenia, Vascular Abnormalities) Abnormal coagulation tests without bleeding 1. Description of…

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