Salicylate NSAIDs Slow Growth of Vestibular Schwannomas

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Salicylates, a class of non-steroidal inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS), reduced the proliferation and viability of cultured vestibular schwannoma cells that can cause intracranial tumors that lead to hearing loss and tinnitus.

Salicylates, also known as acoustic neuroma, have been known to lead to a significant reduction in tumors. Further, its mechanism of action is inhibition of cyclooxygenase 2 (Cox-2), which aligns with study findings that immunohistochemical expression of COX-2 correlates with vestibular schwannoma growth.  

Researchers from Massachusetts Eye and Ear and the Harvard Medical School/ Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Program in Speech and Hearing Bioscience and Technology assessed the efficacy of three salicylates: aspirin, sodium salicylate (NaSal) and 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA). They found that COX-2 was aberrantly expressed in human vestibular schwannomas and primary human vestibular schwannoma cells compared to human nerve specimens and primary Schwann cells that served as controls. Levels of prostaglandin E2 correlated with primary vestibular schwannoma cells proliferation rate.

The drugs decreased proliferation and viability of the cells without increasing death or affecting healthy primary Schwann cells.

The findings are significant because patients with vestibular schwannomas often undergo risky surgical resection or radiotherapy that can have serious complications. Effective drug therapies that can limit tumor growth would be especially helpful in the care of patients. 

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Salicylate NSAIDs Slow Growth of Vestibular Schwannomas

Researchers from Massachusetts Eye and Ear and the Harvard Medical School/ Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Program in Speech and Hearing Bioscience and Technology have demonstrated that salicylates, a class of non-steroidal inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), reduced the proliferation and viability of cultured vestibular schwannoma cells that cause a sometimes lethal intracranial tumor that typically causes hearing loss and tinnitus.

The research is described in "Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Medications are Cytostatic Against Human Vestibular Schwannomas" online in Translational Research.

Vestibular schwannomas are the most common tumors of the cerebellopontine angle and the fourth most common intracranial tumors.

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