Risk for Multiple Sclerosis Relapse Low in Transition From Natalizumab to Dimethyl Fumarate

Share this content:
Patients did show a small increase of disease activity on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans following the transition.
Patients did show a small increase of disease activity on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans following the transition.
The following article is part of conference coverage from the 2018 Annual Meeting of the Consortium of Multiple Sclerosis Centers in Nashville, Tennesssee. Neurology Advisor's staff will be reporting breaking news associated with research conducted by leading experts in neurology. Check back for the latest news from CMSC 2018.

Individuals with multiple sclerosis who transitioned from natalizumab to dimethyl fumarate experienced a low risk for relapse via breakthrough or rebound clinical disease activity within 1 year; however, subjects did show a small increase of disease activity on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans following the transition, according to research presented at the 32nd Annual Meeting of the Consortium of Multiple Sclerosis Centers, held May 30-June 2, 2018, in Nashville, Tennessee.

This retrospective cohort study sought to assess the outcomes for individuals with multiple sclerosis who transitioned from natalizumab to dimethyl fumarate using electronic medical records from the University of Utah Health from March 2012 to the present. The rate of therapy continuation and number of relapses within 1 year were clinically assessed, as were MRI changes within 1 year.

Out of the 512 subjects being treated with natalizumab and/or dimethyl fumarate, 27 had transitioned from natalizumab to dimethyl fumarate, adhered to dimethyl fumarate therapy, and had adequate data for study analysis. One subject out of the 27 (3.7%) experienced a clinical relapse within 1 year, and the MRIs of 5 subjects (18.5%) showed new enhancing or T2 lesions within 1 year. Approximately 8% of subjects remained on dimethyl fumarate therapy.

The study investigators concluded that “our review of MRI scans indicates a modest increase in disease activity following transition and suggests that careful selection and monitoring are required in patients transitioning from natalizumab to [dimethyl fumarate].”

For more coverage of CMSC 2018, click here.

Reference

Waheed M, Rose JW, Wong K, et al. Transition from natalizumab to dimethyl fumarate in multiple sclerosis patients: clinical and magnetic resonance imaging outcomes. Presented at: 2018 CMSC Annual Meeting. May 30-June 2, 2018; Nashville, Tennessee. Abstract DX36.

You must be a registered member of Neurology Advisor to post a comment.

Upcoming Meetings

Sign Up for Free e-newsletters