The following article is part of conference coverage from the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) 2021 Virtual Annual Meeting. Neurology Advisor’s staff will be reporting breaking news associated with research conducted by leading experts in neurology. Check back for the latest news from the AAN 2021 Virtual Annual Meeting.


Oral treatment with rimegepant, a small molecule CGRP receptor antagonist, can substantially reduce the use of analgesics and antiemetics for the acute treatment of migraine in adults, according to study results presented at the American Academy of Neurology 2021 Virtual Annual Meeting, held from April 17 to 22, 2021.

The objective of the current study was to explore the impact of long-term use of rimegepant 75 mg up to once daily on the use of analgesics or antiemetics in adults with migraine.


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The study sample included adults with a history of 2 to 14 monthly migraine attack of moderate-severe pain intensity. Rimegepant was given up to once daily. 1514 patients received rimegepant as needed for 52 weeks to treat migraine attacks of any pain intensity and 286 received rimegepant every other day plus as needed for 12 weeks.

Long-term use of rimegepant was associated with an increase over time in the percentage of patients who did not use analgesics or antiemetics from 19.9% at baseline to 44.6% during weeks 1 to 4 of rimegepant treatment, 58.3% during weeks 5 to 8, and 61.6% during weeks 9 to 12. In the group of patients treated with rimegepant as needed, approximately 67.6% did not use analgesics or antiemetics during weeks 49 to 52.

“Rimegepant 75 mg up to once daily for the acute treatment of migraine substantially reduced the use of analgesics and antiemetics in adults with migraine,” concluded the study researchers.

Reference

Kudrow D, Mullin K, Berman G, et al. Long-term use of rimegepant 75 mg for the acute treatment of migraine reduces use of analgesics and antiemetics. Presented at: the American Academy of Neurology 2021 Virtual Annual Meeting; April 17-22, 2021. Abstract P10.002