The following article is part of conference coverage from the 2021 Annual Meeting of the Consortium of Multiple Sclerosis Centers (CMSC), held October 25-28 2021, in Orlando, Florida. Neurology Advisor’s staff will be reporting breaking news associated with research conducted by leading experts in neurology. Check back for the latest news from the 2021 CMSC Annual Meeting.

 

Online medical education increases knowledge among neurologists of safety considerations for disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) in multiple sclerosis (MS), according to study results presented at the 2021 Annual Meeting of the Consortium of Multiple Sclerosis Centers (CMSC), held October 25 to 28, 2021 in Orlando, Florida.

While DMTs are highly effective and have a key role in the management of patients with MS, safety considerations are important and neurologists should understand and monitor for potential adverse events associated with DMTs. The objective of the current study was to assess the impact of an online continuing medical education (CME) activity to improve the knowledge of potential adverse events associated with these medications.


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The online CME activity consisted of 30-minute video discussion between 3 experts in MS and 112 neurologists completed 4 identical questions pre- and immediately post-activity to determine the educational effect of the intervention.

The online activity resulted in a considerable educational effect, with a significant improvement in identification of the DMT associated with rebound disease activity after treatment withdrawal (improvement of 25% from pre-activity to immediately post-activity),  patient profile at highest risk for progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy during treatment with natalizumab (improvement of 30% from pre-activity to immediately post-activity), and most likely adverse events associated with switching from dimethyl fumarate to cladribine (improvement of 35% from pre-activity to immediately post-activity).

Furthermore, confidence in assessing patients with MS for serious adverse events associated with DMTs increased significantly among neurologists after activity participation.

“The results indicated that a CME-certified 30-minute expert panel discussion was effective at improving knowledge among neurologists regarding the risks associated with DMTs in MS,” concluded the researchers.

Disclosure: One study author declared affiliations with biotech, pharmaceutical, and/or device companies. Please see the original reference for a full list of authors’ disclosures. 

Visit Neurology Advisor’s meetings section for complete coverage of CMSC 2021.

 

Reference

Finnegan T, Murray C, Maeglin J, Coyle PK. Online medical education increases knowledge among neurologists of safety considerations for disease-modifying therapies in multiple sclerosis. Presented at: CMSC 2021 Annual Meeting; October 25-28, 2021; Orlando, Florida. Abstract DMT68.