The following article is part of conference coverage from the 8th Joint American Committee for Treatment and Research in Multiple Sclerosis (ACTRIMS) and European Committee for Treatment and Research in Multiple Sclerosis (ECTRIMS) MSVirtual2020 event. Neurology Advisor‘s staff will be reporting breaking news associated with research conducted by leading experts in neurology. .


Among patients ≥60 years old with multiple sclerosis (MS), treatment with peginterferon beta-1a or intramuscular interferon beta-1a (IM IFN beta-1a) may offer real world treatment benefits, according to study results presented at the 8th Joint American Committee for Treatment and Research in Multiple Sclerosis (ACTRIMS) and European Committee for Treatment and Research in Multiple Sclerosis (ECTRIMS) MSVirtual2020 event, held September 11-13, 2020.

Study researchers sought to identify the clinical effects of peginterferon beta-1a and IM IFN beta-1a on patients ≥60 years old with MS. To do so, they analyzed 817 patients with the disease from MS PATHS, an international network of MS centers. These patients were assessed using Patient Determined Disease Steps (PDDS) and Multiple Sclerosis Performance Test (MSPT) assessments, including the Processing Speed Test (PST), Manual Dexterity Test (MDT), and Walking Speed Test (WST). As of November 2019, the patients had ≥1 follow up clinical assessment with Z-scores based on data from 500 healthy volunteers.

Of the 817 patients, 218 (27%) were aged ≥60 years at baseline. Researchers monitored follow up times at similar intervals for both patients’ ≥60 years and <60 years of age (mean [SD], 1.35 [0.97] and 1.27 [0.94] years, respectively) with MSPT assessments completed at three different time points: 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years).


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Study researchers determined that, at baseline, older patients scored a higher PDDS than younger patients and had a higher incidence of comorbidities such as pain, cardiovascular symptoms, and dyslipidemia. Additionally, patients ≥60 years, were reported having greater functional impairment at baseline than those <60 years based on MDT scores (Z score mean [SD], -0.85 [1.79] vs -0.23 [1.56], respectively) and WST scores (-1.66[3.35] vs -0.52 [2.30], respectively; both P <.001), but not PST (-0.48 [1.00] vs -0.37 [1.11], respectively; P =.197). While change from baseline in these assessments was not significant in patients ≥60 years, those aged <60 years displayed significant improvement in PST at all 3 time points (mean change in Z score, 0.11-0.26; all P ≤.006) and in MDT at 1 and 2 years (mean change in Z-score, 0.24 and 0.36; both P ≤.003. Almost half of both the older and younger age groups were relapse free at 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years (57% and 58%; 48% and 61%; 49% and 60%, respectively).

The researchers concluded that “these results indicate that peginterferon beta-1a and IM IFN beta-1a may provide [real world] treatment benefits to patients with MS, including those aged 60 and above.”

Visit Neurology Advisor‘s conference section for continuous coverage from the ACTRIMS/ECTRIMS MSVirtual2020 Forum.


Reference

Hua L, Liao S, Hersh C, Fitzgerald K, Altincatal A, Naylor M. Characteristics and clinical outcomes of older patients with ms treated with peginterferon beta-1a or intramuscular interferon beta-1a in MS PATHS. Presented at: 8th Joint American Committee for Treatment and Research in Multiple Sclerosis and European Committee for Treatment and Research in Multiple Sclerosis MSVirtual2020 event; September 11-13, 2020. Abstract P0843.