In an analysis of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), vitamin D levels were found to be sufficient in two-thirds of patients assessed, likely due to supplementation, according to study results presented at the 8th Joint American Committee for Treatment and Research in Multiple Sclerosis (ACTRIMS) and European Committee for Treatment and Research in Multiple Sclerosis (ECTRIMS) MSVirtual2020 event, held September 11-13, 2020.

Patients with MS are known to be at risk for vitamin D deficiency. The goal of this study was to analyze the association between vitamin D with clinical outcomes, patient reported outcomes, and quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measures in patients with MS. This retrospective analysis included such patients who were enrolled in the Cleveland Clinic Clinical Practice Data Registry between June 2015 and November 2019. Study researchers recorded serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 levels collected within 90 days of the first multiple sclerosis performance test assessment. Using a cutoff level of 30ng/mL, patients were categorized as sufficient or insufficient. Demographic information, vitamin D supplementation, clinical outcome measures, and patient-reported outcome measures were also obtained.

A total of 369 patients (median age, 47.3 years; 71% women, 79.7% White) were included in the study analysis. The median age at MS diagnosis was 35 years, and the median disease duration was 12.3 years. The median level of vitamin D was 34.1 ng/mL; additionally, 68.6% of patients were receiving supplementation. A total of 62.3% (n=230) patients had sufficient vitamin D levels while 37.7% (n=139) had insufficient levels.

The vitamin D insufficient group had a significantly longer Walking Speed Test  scores compared with the vitamin D sufficient group (median, 7.34 vs 6.56, respectively; P =.028). Manual Dexterity Test dominant hand time had a significant inverse relationship with vitamin D levels, which then became non-significant after regression adjustment.


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Study researchers concluded that “patients at sufficiency had faster walking speeds, but no other differences were found on clinical/MRI measures. We hypothesize that supplementation obscures the relation between vitamin D levels and clinical/MRI measures.”

Reference

Mahadeen A, Abbatemarco J, Briskin I, Ontaneda D. Vitamin D levels and clinical outcomes and quantitative MRI metrics in a real-world MS cohort. Presented at: 8th Joint American Committee for Treatment and Research in Multiple Sclerosis and European Committee for Treatment and Research in Multiple Sclerosis MSVirtual2020 event; September 11-13, 2020. Abstract P0932