Direct Neurostimulation Reduces Focal Seizure Frequency Over Time

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A study, part of the Long-Term Treatment Study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the RNS System, found that responsive direct cortical stimulation reduces partial onset or focal seizures that are resistant to medication and improves quality of life over an average of five years.

The RNS System is FDA-approved to treat adults with focal seizures by sending programmed pulses of electricity to help prevent seizures from occurring. A total of 256 patients had the RNS System implanted and 230 enrolled in the study, with 191 participating until the cutoff date. The median reduction in seizures was 44% at one year and 53% at two years. There was a 60% median reduction in seizures starting at year three and 66% reduction at year six.

Of the 247 participants, 84% saw some seizure frequency reduction, 60% had a 50% or greater reduction, and 16% were seizure-free. Eight percent of participants had a 50% or greater increase in seizure frequency. Although no participants were seizure free over the entire follow-up period, 36.7% were seizure-free for three months or longer, 23% for six months or longer, and 12.9% for one year or longer. 

RNS System
Direct Neurostimulation Reduces Focal Seizure Frequency Over Time

Piotr Olejniczak, MD, PhD, LSU Health New Orleans Professor of Neurology and Director of the Epilepsy Center, contributed to a study of the long-term effectiveness of the first direct brain responsive neurostimulator for partial onset, or focal, seizures that cannot be controlled with medication. The study found that responsive direct cortical stimulation reduces seizures and improves quality of life over an average of 5.4 years. The study is published in the February 24, 2015, issue of the journal, Neurology.

The results are part of the Long-Term Treatment (LTT) Study, an ongoing seven-year multicenter prospective open-label study to evaluate the long-term efficacy and safety of the RNS® System.

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