Some Patients with Lennox-Gastaut Find Success with Surgery

Share this content:

the Neurology Advisor take:

A new study shows that some patients with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS) may be good candidates for curative epilepsy surgery.

Although most patients with LGS are not good candidates for surgery, researchers have identified a small subset of patients, including those with MRI abnormalities and an abnormality on one side of the brain, who could become seizure-free following respective surgery. The data was presented at the annual meeting of the American Epilepsy Society.

Researchers from Cleveland Clinic reviewed the cases of 880 patients who had epilepsy surgery from 2002 to 2012, 63 of which had LGS. 36 of the patients with LGS underwent respective surgery, including 15 that had focal, lobar, or multilobar resection and 21 that had hemispherectomy procedures. Following surgery, 53% of the 36 patients with LGS were seizure free. Those with a one-sided electroencephalographic (EEG) abnormality had more success than those with bilateral abnormalities.

Overall, 66.7% of the patients with LGS were seizure free or had significant improvement following surgery, including three that had 90% improvement and another small group that had 50% to 90% improvement. Four patients had no improvement, but the researchers noted that the epilepsy was likely coming from both sides of the brain in those patients. If patients experienced a seizure within the first week after surgery, their chances of becoming seizure free were reduced.

Although patients with LGS often have developmental delays, no regression in cognitive function was recorded post-surgery. Some parents of patients reported improved function, or the same level of delay. 

Epilepsy surgery
Some Patients with Lennox-Gastaut Find Success with Surgery

Certain patients with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS) may be good candidates for curative epilepsy surgery, emerging research suggests.

A new case series shows that two thirds of patients with LGS were seizure-free or markedly improved following resective surgery.

"Most patients with LGS are not candidates for curative surgery, but there is a small subset, especially the ones with an MRI abnormality, and especially those with an abnormality on one side of the brain, who may be candidates," Ahsan Moosa Naduvil, MD, Section of Pediatric Epilepsy, Cleveland Clinic Epilepsy Center, Ohio, told Medscape Medical News.

READ FULL ARTICLE From Med Scape
You must be a registered member of Neurology Advisor to post a comment.

Sign Up for Free e-newsletters



CME Focus