Pathophysiological Links Found Between Parkinson Disease and Sleep

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A strong pathophysiological link may exist between sleep and Parkinson disease.
A strong pathophysiological link may exist between sleep and Parkinson disease.

A strong pathophysiological link may exist between sleep and Parkinson disease (PD), according to research results published in the Annals of Neurology.

The researchers evaluated 36 patients with PD who underwent whole-night video polysomnography high-density EEG following 1 week of actigraphy. These individuals were divided into 3 groups based on the stage of disease — de novo (DNV, n=9), advanced (ADV, n=13), and dyskinetic (DYS, n=14). These participants were then matched by age to a control group (n=12). The whole-night video polysomnography high-density EEG was divided temporarily from T1 to T10, and analyses were performed. T2, T3, and T4 were considered early sleep and compared with T7, T8, and T9, or late sleep.

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The results revealed that all groups, DYS group excluded, manifested a slow wave activity (SWA) decrease between early and late sleep. Members of the control group had significantly greater SWA than patients with PD (P <.01). Delta power was greater in the DNV group than the other groups (P <.01), and delta power was greater in the ADV group than the DYS group (<.01). The DYS group had the lowest SWA when compared with the other groups. Researchers also noted significant variations between early and late sleep, except in the DNV group. In late sleep, delta power was lower in the DNV group than the other groups (P <.01) and lower in the ADV group than the DYS group (P <.01). The DYS group had the most SWA among all PD patient groups.

According to researchers, the results support findings “of a clear association between sleep and [levodopa-induced dyskinesia] at the electrophysiological, behavioral, and biochemical levels.”

Reference

Amato N, Manconi M, Möller JC, et al. Levodopa-induced dyskinesia in Parkinson's disease: sleep matters [published online October 17, 2018]. Ann Neurol. doi: 10.1002/ana.25360

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