Consider Restless Genital Syndrome in Parkinson's

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Parkinson’s disease (PD) is rarely associated with discomfort in the genital region; however, researchers suggest that restless genital syndrome should be a part of the differential diagnosis in PD patients, according to a study published in JAMA Neurology.

Restless genital syndrome, sometimes also referred to as persistent genital arousal disorder (PGAD), causes feelings of pain, discomfort, tingling and burning sensations in the genital region and can be disabling and very distressing to patients.

A woman aged 65 years with PD complaining of severe and persistent discomfort in the genital region. Symptoms occurred at night and were often triggered by sitting or lying down for periods of time. During examination, no gynecological abnormalities were observed. She was treated with a low dose of a dopamine agonist and reported improvement.

Although the disorder is rare, researchers suggest that restless genital syndrome be included in the differential diagnosis of genital symptoms and restlessness, as well as nonmotor wearing off and akathisia. Treatment with dopamine agonists can improve symptoms. 

Female patient
In PD, Restless Genital Syndrome Should Be Considered

In this case study, Camila C. Aquino, MD, MSc, of the Morton and Gloria Shulman Movement Disorders Center at Toronto Western Hospital in Ontario, Canada, and colleagues observed a female Parkinson's disease patient complaining of severe and disabling symptoms in the genital region, including burning sensations, tingling and pain. Previous rare cases were attributed to nonmotor off symptoms.

While restless genital syndrome is rare, researchers suggest that it be included in the differential diagnosis of genital symptoms and restlessness, and recommend treatment with a dopamine agonist. 

READ FULL ARTICLE From archneur.jamanetwork.com
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