Patient Care at the Intersection of Rheumatology and Neurology

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Rheumatologists and neurologists are known to manage and collaborate between their specialties in the care of patients with shared diagnoses, such as disorders of the central nervous system, like giant cell arthritis and neuropsychiatric lupus. 

In this episode, done in collaboration with Neurology Advisor, neurologist Michael Kornberg, MD, and rheumatologist Laura C. Cappelli, MD, discuss the management of patients with rheumatologic conditions with neurologic manifestations, including defining the term “neurorheumatology,” encouraging better collaboration between the 2 specialties, and improving access to care for this patient population.

Read the full transcript for this episode here.

Michael Kornberg, MD , is an assistant professor of neurology at the Division of Neuroimmunology and Neurological Infections and associate director of the Adult Neurology Residency Program at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Maryland. He specializes in the care of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and other immune-mediated central nervous system (CNS) disorders.

In addition to his clinical work, Dr Kornberg conducts a basic and translational research program aimed at better understanding the pathogenesis of MS, particularly mechanisms driving progressive MS and remyelination failure, with a goal of developing improved therapies.

Laura C. Cappelli, MD, is an assistant professor of medicine and oncology in the Division of Rheumatology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and a faculty member of the Johns Hopkins Arthritis Center.

Dr Cappelli completed her residency in internal medicine and fellowship in rheumatology at the Johns Hopkins Hospital, where she also earned her MD. She obtained her Masters of Health Science (MHS) in clinical investigation at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Her primary research focus is rheumatologic adverse effects of cancer immunotherapy, including the clinical characteristics, epidemiology, impact on patients, and biologic mechanisms of these adverse events.

Dr Cappelli co-chairs the Immune Related Toxicity Team at Johns Hopkins. In addition, she studies rheumatoid arthritis, focusing on patients with seronegative disease and on the use of autoantibodies as biomarkers.

This article originally appeared on Rheumatology Advisor