FDA Approves First Electronic Autoinjector for Multiple Sclerosis Treatment

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FDA Approves First Electronic Autoinjector for Multiple Sclerosis Treatment
FDA Approves First Electronic Autoinjector for Multiple Sclerosis Treatment

The U.S. FDA has approved Bayer's BetaConnect, the first electronic autoinjector for the treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). The BetaConnect system will be available exclusively to Betaseron patients beginning early next year.

“Offering new options to individuals with MS to help manage their disease is important since ‘one size does not fit all' when considering MS treatment,” said Douglas Franklin, president and chief executive Ooficer of the Multiple Sclerosis Association of America in a statement. “Betaseron was the first disease-modifying therapy approved by the FDA to treat RRMS patients, and today we are pleased to offer the first and only electronic auto injector for those living with the disease,” added Klaus Marten, Bayer's vice president and general manager of neurology.

The BetaConnect system allows current Betaseron patients to customize their injection speed and depth settings using the included syringes in their Betaseron packaging. The BetaConnect system also included a back-up reminder that alerts the patient when it is time for the next injection. During the automatic needed insertion and retraction, the system uses an audio and visual end-of-dose indication to let the patient know that the injection is complete.

“Injectables are an important therapeutic option for RRMS and the FDA approval of BetaConnect represents an important step that gives patients the ability to tailor certain aspects of their injections,” said Amy Perrin Ross, APN, MSN, CNRN, MSCN, past president of the International Organization of MS Nurses, in a statement.

For safety information for Betaseron, go here.

For instructions on how to use BetaConnect, go here.

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