Cognitive Decline in Men Linked to Low Serum Sodium

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Low serum sodium is linked to cognitive impairment in community-dwelling men.
Low serum sodium is linked to cognitive impairment in community-dwelling men.

HealthDay News — Low serum sodium is associated with cognitive impairment and cognitive decline among community-dwelling older men, according to a study published online in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

Kristen L. Nowak, PhD, MPH, from the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus in Aurora, and colleagues examined whether lower normal serum sodium is associated with cognitive impairment and the risk of cognitive decline in a study involving 5435 community-dwelling older men.

The researchers found that the fasting mean serum sodium level was 141 ± 3 mmol/L. Overall, 15%, 12%, and 13% of participants in tertiles 1 (126 to 140 mmol/L), 2 (141 to 142 mmol/L), and 3 (143 to 153 mmol/L), respectively, had prevalent cognitive impairment. Lower serum sodium correlated with prevalent cognitive impairment after adjustment (tertile 1 vs 2: OR, 1.30). Cognitive decline was observed in 14%, 10%, and 13% of participants in tertiles 1, 2, and 3, respectively. There was also an association for lower serum sodium with cognitive decline (tertile 1 vs 2: OR, 1.37). Additional associations were seen for prevalent cognitive impairment and cognitive decline in tertile 3.

"In community-dwelling older men, serum sodium between 126 to 140 mmol/L is independently associated with prevalent cognitive impairment and cognitive decline," the authors write.

Two authors disclosed financial ties to the pharmaceutical industry.

Reference

Nowak KL, Yaffe K, Orwoll ES, et al. Serum sodium and cognition in older community-dwelling men [published online February 8, 2018]. Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. doi:10.2215/CJN.07400717



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