REHACOP Training Can Improve Cognitive Function in Parkinson's Disease

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Cognitive training is more effective than occupational therapy in improving cognition and functional disabilities in patients with Parkinson’s disease, according to a study published in Neurology.

REHACOP cognitive training programs have previously proven effective in patients with psychosis and schizophrenia.

Javier Peña, PhD, of the University of Deusto, Bilbao, Spain, and colleagues explored the efficacy of a REHACOP training program compared to occupational activities to improve cognition, clinical symptoms, and functional disability in Parkinson’s disease patients. 

The researchers assigned 42 patients diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease in Hoehn & Yahr stages 1 to 3 to either the REHACOP group or control group, which performed occupational activities. The team observed processing speed, verbal and visual memory, executive function, theory of mind, functional disability and neuropsychiatric symptoms like depression and apathy.

Study results revealed significant differences in the mean change scores between the REHACOP group and the occupational control group in processing speed, visual memory, theory of mind, and functional disability.

The results provide evidence that an integrative cognitive training program is useful in improving mental and physical function in patients with Parkinson’s disease. The researchers stressed that future studies should examine the long-term effects of such intervention as a standard of care for Parkinson’s disease patients. 

Doctor consulting patient
REHACOP Training Can Improve Cognitive Function in Parkinson's Disease

This study, published in Neurology, found REHACOP cognitive training more beneficial than occupational activities for the improvement of cognition, clinical symptoms, and functional disabilities in patients with Parkinson's disease.

Javier Peña, PhD, of the University of Deusto, Bilbao, Spain, and colleagues found that patients with PD receiving cognitive training with REHACOP demonstrated statistically significant and clinically meaningful changes in processing speed, visual memory, theory of mind, and functional disability. These findings support the integration of cognitive training into the standard of care for patients with PD.

READ FULL ARTICLE From www.neurology.org
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