Worsening Burnout and Job Satisfaction Leads to Reduced Working Hours

Share this content:
Worsening Burnout and Job Satisfaction Leads to Reduced Working Hours
Worsening Burnout and Job Satisfaction Leads to Reduced Working Hours

HealthDay News -- Full-time physicians reporting worsening burnout or decreased job satisfaction are more likely to reduce their work hours, according to a study published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

The researchers used administrative/payroll records to assess the work status of faculty physicians working for Mayo Clinic from Oct. 1, 2008, to Oct. 1, 2014.

Based on a survey of 1856 physicians, full-time physicians who report worsening burnout or show decreasing job satisfaction are more likely to reduce their working hours. For each 1-point increase on a 7-point emotional exhaustion scale the likelihood of reducing full-time employment over the next 24 months was increased by 43%. Each 1-point decrease in the 5-point satisfaction score correlated with a 34% increased likelihood of reducing work hours.

"Among physicians in a large health care organization, burnout and declining satisfaction were strongly associated with actual reductions in professional work effort over the following 24 months," the authors write.

Reference

Shanafelt TD, Mungo M, Schmitgen J, et al. Longitudinal Study Evaluating the Association Between Physician Burnout and Changes in Professional Work Effort. Mayo Clin Proc. 2016;91(4):422-31.

You must be a registered member of Neurology Advisor to post a comment.

Sign Up for Free e-newsletters



CME Focus