Myocardial Infarction, Stroke Increase Functional Disability Over Time

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Hospitalizations for myocardial infarction and stroke are associated with significant increases in functional disability, according to a study published in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

Lead researcher Deborah A. Levine, MD, MPH, from the Division of General Medicine at the University of Michigan, and colleagues found that patients hospitalized for myocardial infarction (MI) or stroke had increases in functional disability both at the time of the event and in the 10 years after.

The study included participants from the Health and Retirement Study with linked Medicare data (1998-2010). The researchers determined changes in functional limitations and cognitive impairment after hospitalization for stroke (n=432) and MI (n=450), controlling for premorbid functioning using fixed-effects regression.

MI resulted in an acute increase of 0.41 functional limitations with a linear increase of 0.14 per year for the following decade for patients without baseline impairments. Patients with mild-to-moderate impairment at baseline had a 0.65 acute increase, followed by a 0.27 linear increase per year for the next decade.

Stroke resulted in an acute increase of 2.07 limitations with a linear increase of 0.15 per year for the next decade in patients with no impairments at baseline. Patients with mild-to-moderate impairment at baseline had a 2.65 acute increase with a 0.19 linear increase per year for the following decade.

The results of this study indicate that patients who have experienced MI or stroke should be screened for functional disability over a long-term period.

Hospitalization for MI or stroke increases patients' functional impairment.
Myocardial Infarction, Stroke Increase Functional Disability Over Time

This study assessed the acute and long-term effect of myocardial infarction (MI) and stroke on postevent functional disability and cognition while controlling for survivors' changes in functioning over the years before the event.

Lead researcher Deborah A. Levine, MD, MPH, from the Division of General Medicine at the University of Michigan, and colleagues found that in this population-based cohort, most MI and stroke hospitalizations were associated with significant increases in functional disability at the time of the event and in the decade afterward. Survivors of MI and stroke warrant screening for functional disability over the long-term.

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