HealthDay News — For Chinese adults with normal kidney function, higher depressive symptoms are associated with an increased risk for rapid kidney function decline, according to a study published online May 28 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

Zhuxian Zhang, M.D., from Southern Medical University in China, and colleagues examined the prospective association between depressive symptoms and rapid decline in kidney function among 4,763 Chinese adults with normal kidney function (estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] ≥60mL/min per 1.73 m2).

The researchers found that 6 percent of participants developed rapid decline in kidney function during a median follow-up of four years. After adjustments for major demographic, clinical, or psychosocial covariates, a significant positive association was observed between baseline depressive symptoms and rapid decline in kidney function (adjusted odds ratio, 1.15 per 5-score increment). A significantly higher risk for rapid decline in kidney function was seen for those with high depressive symptoms compared with those with low depressive symptoms (total Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale ≥10 versus <10: adjusted odds ratio, 1.39). The results were similar for the secondary outcome of an annualized decline in eGFR of ≥5 mL/min per 1.73 m2 and to a level of <60 mL/min per 1.73m2 at the exit visit (adjusted odds ratio, 1.26 per 5-score increment).


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“If further confirmed, our data provide some evidence for depressive symptom screening and effective psychosocial interventions to improve the prevention of [chronic kidney disease],” one coauthor said in a statement.

Abstract/Full Text