Intracerebral Hemorrhage More Common in HIV Patients

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HIV infection may increase the risk of intracerebral hemorrhage, according to a study published in Neurology.

Felicia C. Chow, MD, MAS, of the University of California San Francisco’s departments of neurology and epidemiology and biostatistics, and colleagues, found that the incidence rate of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) was greater in people infected with HIV than those not (2.29 per 1,000 person-years in HIV-infected individuals compared with 1.23 per 1,000 person-years in uninfected individuals).

Although cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events are more common in HIV patients, the link between HIV and intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), which is distinct from ischemic stroke, is unclear. The researchers analyzed a clinical care HIV cohort in the United States from 1996 to 2009, and looked to compare the rates of ICH in HIV-infected and uninfected persons and to assess risk factors of ICH. Results showed an association between HIV and ICH, but the risk seemed to diminish with increasing age. Uninfected females had a lower risk of ICH, but not those in the HIV cohort. CD4 count <200 × 106 cells/L and anticoagulant use were also predictive of ICH.

The researchers concluded that HIV-infected individuals, especially those young in age and female, have a higher hazard of ICH.

HIV pandemic's origins located
Intracerebral Hemorrhage More Common in HIV Patients

This study explores the association between HIV infection and intracerebral hemorrhage, a distinct event from other cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events associated with HIV. 

Felicia C. Chow, MD, MAS, of the University of California San Francisco's departments of neurology and epidemiology and biostatistics, and colleagues, compared rates of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) in HIV-infected and uninfected individuals in a large clinical care cohort. The rate of ICH was 2.29 per 1,000 person-years in HIV-infected individuals compared with 1.23 per 1,000 person-years in uninfected individuals

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